Found 21 courses
SUBJECT

COURSE LEVEL

INSTITUTION

COURSE TYPE
social sciences  subject

Ανθρωπολογία της Συγγένειας [open]

Venetia Kantsa - Undergraduate - (A-)
Department of Social Anthropology and History, Aegean University

Although kinship has been a privileged field of anthropological study and research for about a century, its significance has come in for a lot of controversy during the last decades of the 20th century. Recently there is a renewed and growing interest in its study due to the influence of the Schneiderian symbolic approach, feminist analysis of gender, reproduction and sexuality and ethnographic accounts of relatedness in difference contexts.

social sciences  subject

Ανθρωπολογία της Συγγένειας και του Φύλου [open]

Venetia Kantsa - Postgraduate - (A-)
Social Anthropology and History, Aegean University

This course attempts to present and analyze the main anthropological approaches concerning the study of kinship and gender.

social sciences  subject

Memory and Oral History

Riki Van Boeschoten - Undergraduate - (A)
Department of History, Archaeology and Social Anthropology, University of Thessaly

Oral history records the living memory of first-hand witnesses of the past and opens new pathways for the reconstruction and interpretation of recent history. The unique nature of oral sources and life stories places oral history at the intersection between history, anthropology and the psychology of memory. This course offers an introduction to oral history interviewing, the study of life stories and social memory, and oral history theory. A group of nine students conducted their own interviews on cinema, as a form of popular entertainment in Volos city.

social sciences  subject

Ανθρωπολογία της Συγγένειας και του Φύλου [open]

Venetia Kantsa - Postgraduate - (A-)
Social Anthropology and History, Aegean University

This course attempts to present and analyze the main anthropological approaches concerning the study of kinship and gender.

social sciences  subject

Ethnography: Shaping the contemporary field

Penelope, Riki, Dafni, Vasiliki Papailias, Van Boeschoten, Tragaki, Giakoumaki - Undergraduate - (A+)
Department of History, Archaeology and Social Anthropology, University of Thessaly

Τhis course provides an opportunity for students to come into contact with cutting edge topics in ethnographic fieldwork, while at the same time giving them a chance to apply some basic research skills. This course is not a historical overview of the methodology of ethnography. To the contrary, we begin with the contemporary concerns and ideas of working anthropologists. Our main question is: what is—and what could be—the “field” of ethnographic study in the contemporary situation. In our examination of this subject we will extend our conversation beyond conventional borders to speak about subjects, such as the non-academic uses of ethnography (i.e., in marketing, by the army), the use of ethnography in other disciplines (i.e., education), the relation of ethnography to political activism and, finally, the future possibilities for qualitative methodologies in the contemporary technocratic university. This course, which is co-taught by the faculty members of the Social Anthropology section, is part of the “Open Access Digital Courses” of the University of Thessaly. Most of the meetings of the course will be videotaped. While this course is primarily intended for undergraduate social anthropology majors, students from other majors, who have a demonstrated interest in the subject and taken previous courses in anthropology, can be admitted after consultation with the instructors.

social sciences  subject

Ethnomedicine

Diana Riboli - Undergraduate - (A-)
Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University

This course explores medical systems in different cultural contexts. Students will engage in analysis and investigation of ethnomedical systems such as shamanism, healing systems in different oral cultures, alternative and complementary medical systems (with particular emphasis to Chinese medicine and Ayurveda). The course will also introduce the students to medical pluralism, ethnopsychiatry, and ethnobotany. Starting from the fact that biomedicine can be considered the main ethnomedical system of industrialized and mostly western countries, the lessons will present cases of conflicts, acceptance and/or collaboration between different medical systems, in the global world.

social sciences  subject

Anthropology of Modern Greece

Ourania Astrinaki - Undergraduate - (A-)
Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University

The course "Anthropology of Modern Greece" is a systematic introduction to anthropological studies carried out in the Greek space from strangers at the beginning and then on Greek ethnographers, from the 1960s to today. Starting from the discussion of the conditions that contributed to the transition of anthropology from the "exotic" in the "intimate" European space, with a stopover most "exotic" and remote communities in southern European countryside, we will follow the gradual development of anthropological studies in Greece and changes that characterized it. Having refer to studies of rural sociologists and human geography of the French, mainly school in rural areas, we will focus our attention in the first anthropological studies of rural communities. These studies hiring the Greek villages as almost "closed, traditional and homogeneous communities" that are not fully integrated into the Greek state formation and modernity and are therefore not affected much by them. Then we will outline the gradual introduction of multiplicity in the studies of Greek society and the recognition and promotion of the complexity of them. We will discuss the different periods of Greek ethnography, the most important theme that occupied every time the scholars of Greek society, the geographical dispersion of the studies and the different theoretical and methodological approaches that scholars have applied. Also, we will deal with the important transformations that have occurred in Greek society to the commencement of anthropological studies and after that, transformations that contributed to change the same visual of these studies and had resulted in the introduction of history in these studies. In this context, the course of anthropology of modern Greece is deleted through a series of displacements of uniformity in multiplicity, from holistic to partial approaches from rural areas into the urban and the synchrony in the introduction of the history and handling transformations. Our interest we will focus on five sections.

social sciences  subject

Methodology of Social Anthropology

Diana Riboli - Undergraduate - (A-)
Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University

The course discusses the theory and method of ethnographic research, focusing on (a) the historical development of anthropology and (b) the way in which the collection of ethnographic data is associated with both theoretical and methodological issues. The course refers to methodological and epistemological concepts and tools of anthropology and critically discusses issues such as: the politics and practices of fieldwork; the ethnographer as subject and object of observation; inter-subjectivity and reflexive anthropology; the faces of incorporation/integration during fieldwork and the processes of ‘immersion into otherness’. It also analyses issues of “anthropology at home”, “anthropology as text", as well as issues of ethnographic research in complex societies and urban populations. The course also discusses methodological and epistemological issues referring to the collection/construction of research ‘data’ through participant observation, and also by the use of biographical methods and interviews. An ethnographic approach to archival material and communication networks is also introduced. The course also considers the art and the technique of observation and participation and the comparison between the so-called ‘quantitative’ and ‘qualitative’ methods of study. It also introduces the method of content analysis with the use of computerised analytical packages and discusses the benefits of techniques such as the use of video, film and photographs in the presentation and analysis of fieldwork data. Important note: "This collection of articles and extracts from academic writings made for the purpose of educational support Course Spring semester 'Methodology of Social Anthropology" at the Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, in accordance with Articles 19 and 21 of Law. 2121/1993 on "Copyright, related rights and cultural issues. Reproduction of this is permissible only within this framework, each further reproduction thereof for a purpose other than the aforementioned prohibited is the sole responsibility of the person who owned and is a violation of copyright law. "

social sciences  subject

Ethnomedicine

Diana Riboli - Undergraduate - (A-)
Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University

This course explores medical systems in different cultural contexts. Students will engage in analysis and investigation of ethnomedical systems such as shamanism, healing systems in different oral cultures, alternative and complementary medical systems (with particular emphasis to Chinese medicine and Ayurveda). The course will also introduce the students to medical pluralism, ethnopsychiatry, and ethnobotany. Starting from the fact that biomedicine can be considered the main ethnomedical system of industrialized and mostly western countries, the lessons will present cases of conflicts, acceptance and/or collaboration between different medical systems, in the global world.

social sciences  subject

Anthropology of violence and conflict

Ourania Astrinaki - Undergraduate - (A-)
Department of Social Anthropology, Panteion University

In this course recent anthropological considerations phenomena latent and open violence in the western and non-western societies that approach them as historical, social, political and cultural phenomena. It analyzes the approaches of classical social and anthropological theory and the dominant perceptions of violence in the "civilized world" which they associate with the "nature of man". Investigates the key role of these concepts both in the western imaginary and social practices and the establishment of Western societies and states and in the imaginary construction of non-Western peoples and cultures as "wild", which contributed to the legitimacy of global Western domination. Finally, they presented ethnographic examples which highlight the complex relationship of the formations of violence with local and global patterns of power and the production of social inequalities, to the establishment of local stories and local identities.